Surgical Preparation and Guidelines


To prepare for your surgical experience, please follow the guidelines below, unless instructed by your physician otherwise:

Contact your pre-operative nurse at (817) 748-8700 with any additional questions you may have prior to the day of surgery.

Pre-Registration:

We work closely with your physician to obtain your pertinent registration information prior to surgery. However, it may be necessary for us to contact you. We respect the value of your time and strive to make this process seamless for you.

Pre-Admission:

Prior to your scheduled surgery date, we will meet with you to complete any necessary pre-surgical testing. This is also a time for you to ask any questions that you might have prior to surgery.


The Day of Surgery, Before Your Procedure:

Unless otherwise specified by your physician, please plan to arrive at the hospital at least one hour before your surgery is scheduled. This will allow you to get comfortable and take care of a few remaining details.

During this time, you will be asked to complete admission paperwork, sign consent forms and meet with a nurse to complete an initial questionnaire.

Also, an anesthesiologist or certified registered nurse anesthetist will be available to address any additional questions or concerns you might have.

After your procedure:

You will go to the recovery room after surgery, where you will be closely monitored by a registered nurse for 30 minutes to an hour. You then may be transferred to the Step-Down Recovery Room to be observed a while longer. In some cases, you may go directly from surgery to the Step-Down Recovery Room.

During Your Stay:

The length of your stay will vary depending on your type of surgery. Many patients return home soon after surgery. You will work with your physician and healthcare team to plan your discharge.

We encourage you to have a family member ask questions about your care, if your visit requires an overnight stay. You may need assistance upon returning home, and we welcome your family to participate in your care. This helps them support you during your recovery.

If you anticipate an overnight stay, please have your family bring your regular medications with you.

We strive to make your stay a comfortable and positive experience. Whether your stay with us is a few hours or a few days, any request you may have will be met with a smile.

Going Home:

It is best not to be alone after surgery. You should make arrangements, in advance of your surgery, to have someone pick you up at the hospital and get you settled in at home. Also, if you are able to have someone stay with you at home for at least a few days, it is ideal.

It is unsafe for you to drive if you are under the influence of anesthesia. In this situation, we will be unable to release you until there is someone available to drive you home. We also discourage driving, operating machinery, drinking alcoholic beverages, or taking medications other than those prescribed by your physician for at least 24 hours after your release. Your reaction time may be impaired, making these types of activities dangerous.

We recommend that you not sign any important papers or make critical decisions until the effects of anesthesia have worn off.

Your physician and/or nurse will give you specific post-operative instructions. They will be reviewed with you and your caregiver prior to leaving the hospital. Please ask any questions you need to be very clear on what symptoms require immediate notification to your physician. Those and any other questions or concerns following surgery can be addressed directly to your physician.


Pediatric Services

Our medical staff is specially trained to provide the individual care that our pediatric patients deserve. Children are not just small adults, they have unique needs, and we make it a priority to meet those needs. Part of making your child’s visit to Harris Methodist Southlake a positive one is helping them feel more familiar with the facility. A tour can be arranged prior to your child’s procedure simply by calling our main number and asking about our pediatric tours.

Please Call 817-748-8700

The Day of Imaging Study, Before Your Study:

Unless otherwise specified by your physician, please plan to arrive at the hospital 30 minutes before your imaging study is scheduled. This will allow you to get comfortable and take care of a few remaining details.

During this time, you will be asked to complete your admission paperwork, sign consent forms and meet with a technologist to complete an initial questionnaire.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

MRI studies are examinations that allow us to obtain detailed images of any part of the body without the use of x-rays. To produce these images, MRI uses a large magnet, radio waves and a computer. The procedure is safe and painless.

Preparation:

Prior to the MRI, you may engage in your daily routine and take your usual medications. Most patients eat and drink as usual the day of the examination, but in some instances you may be asked to fast for a few hours prior to examination. You will wear a scrub suit to eliminate metal objects such as zippers, buckles and metallic thread that will interfere with the magnet. Glasses, hairpins, watches, and jewelry should be removed. We encourage you to leave your valuables at home or with a family member, as valuables cannot be taken inside the examination room.

Metal and the MRI:

Metal objects can drastically affect MRI test results. If you have a pacemaker, surgical clips, prosthesis, metal implants, metal fragments or any other metal objects in your body, please inform your doctor or the technologist performing your study.

Contrast:

Contrast agents are special liquids that enhance the accuracy and quality of the exam. Allergic reactions are extremely rare. Please inform the staff if you have any known allergies.

During the Examination:

With assistance of a Magnetic Resonance (MR) technologist, you will be positioned on a padded table that will move into a large open-ended cylinder containing the magnet. If you are uncomfortable in small spaces, please mention this to the MR technologist. Rest assured that the MR technologist is in constant contact with you through an intercom and viewing window that allows him or her to see and hear you throughout the exam. The exam takes about 30 to 60 minutes, depending on the type of study. During the MRI process, you will hear a rhythmic thumping sound. It is important that you lay still, because motion will blur the pictures. Calm breathing will not disrupt the study.

Results:

Your MRI study will be interpreted by a board-certified radiologist, who will give the report to your doctor. Your doctor will discuss the results of the examination with you. Unless your doctor instructs you otherwise, you may resume normal diet and activities after the MRI scan.

Computed Tomography (CT Scan):

A CT scan is a test combining x-rays with a computer to create images that appear as slices. The result is a detailed group of images that help diagnose problems with soft tissue, organs, and bones.

Preparation:

Preparations for the CT Study may vary depending on the area of the body to be scanned. You may be asked to fast for four hours before the exam. When you arrive for your appointment, you may be asked to drink contrast half an hour or two hours prior to your procedure, if you are having an abdominal or pelvic CT study. Also, intravenous (IV) contrast may be administered for CT Studies of the brain, neck , chest, abdomen, and pelvis.

Contrast:

Contrast agents are special liquids that enhance the accuracy and quality of the CT scan. Allergic reactions are extremely rare. Please inform the CT staff if you have any known allergies.

During the Scan:

You may be asked to change into a scrub suit or hospital gown. You will then lie on a platform that slides into a cylinder that is open on both sides. The technologist may ask you ton hold your breath for a few seconds. You will be asked to wait briefly to make sure the images are complete.

Test Results:

Your examination will be interpreted by a board-certified radiologist, who will then transmit the report to your doctor. Your doctor will discuss the results of the examination with you. Unless your doctor instructs you otherwise, you may resume normal diet and activities after the CT scan.

Ultrasound:

Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make still and moving pictures of the heart, digestive, reproductive or urinary tract, or any other soft tissue structures within the body. There have been no harmful effects reported from the use of ultrasound.

Preparation:

For Full Bladder Exam (Pelvis or O.B.), start with an empty bladder. Drink five (5) glasses of water (eight ounces per glass) by one hour before your appointment time. Do not empty your bladder.

* Partially filled bladder exam (Kidney or Prostate). Drink three (3) glasses of water (eight ounces per glass) by one hour before your appointment.

* Fasting (Abdomen). While fasting, have nothing to eat or drink after midnight the night before the exam. The abdominal area may include any of the following: gall bladder, liver, pancreas, spleen, aorta, inferior vena cava (ICV), or biliary tree.

During Exam:

When you arrive for your exam, you may be asked to wear a gown. This is done primarily to protect your clothes from the ultrasound gel that will be applied to the skin over the area to be examined. You will be asked to lie on an ultrasound bed next to the ultrasound scanner. After the gel is applied, a hand-held instrument called a transducer will be guided slowly across your skin. The procedure is generally painless and is usually completed in less than 45 minutes.

Results:

When the exam is complete, you may be asked to remain on the examining table for a few minutes while the technologist reviews the ultrasound pictures for clarity. Your examination will be interpreted by a board-certified radiologist, who will discuss the results of the examination with you.

Diagnostic Radiology and Fluoroscopy (R&F):

This technique uses very low doses of radiation to give physicians a clear image of various body structures.

Preparation:

Please ask your physician for information and preparation related to your procedure. You may be asked to fast prior to your exam or to arrive early for contrast preparation.

During the Examination:

The average x-ray exam is 20-35 minutes. Barium studies will vary from 30 minuets to over an hour, depending on the type of study. Some examinations require that the patient change into a hospital gown. The ordering physician will notify the patient of what to expect.

Contrast:

Contrast agents are special liquids that enhance the accuracy and quality of the exam. Allergic reactions are extremely rare. Please inform the staff if you have any known allergies.

Results:

Your examination will be interpreted by a board-certified radiologist, who will give the report to your doctor. Your doctor will discuss the results of the examination with you. Unless your doctor instructs you otherwise, you may resume normal diet and activities after the exam.